Currently Browsing: Debra Thimmesch

Get Into the Zine Zone at the Brooklyn Museum

“This exhibition contains graphic content and language. Viewer discretion is advised.” – Brooklyn Museum

Consider yourself sufficiently advised. Entering the Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition, Copy Machine Manifestos: Artists Who Make Zines, is tantamount to flinging yourself headlong into one of the countless, teeming, live alternative music venues like I frequented in my 20s and early 30s.read more.

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Enigma and Elegance in Chie Yoshii’s Surrealist Paintings

“Ethereal,” “luminous,” “cryptic,” “sensual,” and “surreal” are adjectives used frequently to describe the work of Japanese-born artist Chie Yoshii. And for good reason. One look at her paintings — which are featured in  Pomegranate’s 2024 calendar “Guardians” — and it becomes clear that these descriptors of Chie’s work are apt.read more.

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Catherine Marion’s Fantastical Universes of Flora and Fauna

Georgia O’Keeffe once said, ​​“When you take a flower in your hand and really look at it, it’s your world for the moment. I want to give that world to someone else.”

Artist Catherine Marion creates entire worlds of stylized flora and fauna, especially flowers and birds, for wallpaper and other products. Her wallpaper designs, however, are what she imagines when she sits down to draw.read more.

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Camille Eskell and the Plight of the Fez-Maker’s Granddaughter

For artist Camille Eskell, the fez is laden with potent personal symbolic meaning as vast as its far-reaching mix of geographical and socio-cultural connotations. 

“I often use the fez cap,” she elucidates, “as a structural base for storytelling to signify the foundation, and the patriarchal base, established by both my grandfathers.” read more.

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Kenojuak Ashevak: The Inuit Art of a Modern Printmaker

Kenojuak Ashevak once told an interviewer that she aimed to make viewers happy with her colorful prints and drawings, a modest aspiration for an artist who has been referred to as a “national treasure” in Canada. Kenojuak rose to prominence in the late 1950s with her experimental printmaking, which seemed to white audiences in Southern Canada to be emblematic of the Inuit artistic aesthetic.read more.

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Spandita Malik: Meshes of Resistance, Threads of Hope

Photographer Spandita Malik has produced at least three portraits of Parween Devi. In each instance, the latter has been a partner in the creative process, contributing her expert needlework. In a portrait in Spandita’s Vadhu: The Embroidered Bride series, Parween sits for her bridal portrait in a plastic chair in front of a cabinet which holds an older-model television.read more.

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